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  • On March 12, Kateryna Zarembo took part in a discussion “Who will be the superpowers in the 21st century and will it make the world safer?”, organized by the Ilko Kucheriv Democratic Initiatives Foundation.

On March 12, Kateryna Zarembo took part in a discussion “Who will be the superpowers in the 21st century and will it make the world safer?”, organized by the Ilko Kucheriv Democratic Initiatives Foundation.

On March 12, the Ilko Kucheriv Democratic Initiatives Foundation presented the results of research on the attitude of Ukrainians to superpowers. At the invitation of the Foundation, Kateryna Zarembo took part in a discussion of the survey results.

The research was conducted by the analogy of a global study of the Gallup International Association, which, in particular, included questions: 1) which countries will be superpowers in 2030; 2) is their impact (de) stabilizing?

Pavlo Klimkin (Minister for Foreign Affairs of Ukraine (2014–2019), Mykhailo Honchar (President of the Сentre for Global Studies Strategy XXI, Editor-in-Chief of the Black Sea Security Magazine, Member of the Public Council at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs) and Orysia Lutsevych (Chairman of the Ukrainian Forum, Chatham House) also took part in the discussion of the opinion poll results.

Speakers, in particular, spoke about the confrontation between the United States and China, the role of regional actors, and recommendations for Ukraine in the international order, where the confrontation of superpowers means the confrontation of regimes and values.

During her speech Kateryna Zarembo pointed out the following:

  • “China is currently having a hybrid influence in the world. It is informational, economic, and security influence. And Ukraine is already affected. But the difference is what values are behind it. Whether there is freedom of speech behind it or not. Whereas American support implies any statements, including criticism of the United States, Chinese support does not. And there is a big difference between these regimes.”
  • “Ukraine, which has a regional foreign policy, quite reasonably considers Western European countries and the United States its strategic partners. At the same time, it is impossible not to be interested in what China is promoting today, as it poses a threat to Ukrainian subjectivity.”
  • “Now we can also talk about China’s “soft power” in Ukraine as regards the so-called victory over the coronavirus. At one point, this was considered a success story in Ukraine, and there were even voices that a pandemic could not be overcome in a democracy, it could only be done with a “strong hand” and authoritarianism.”

The summary and full video recording of the discussion are available here.