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  • On June 23, a presentation of the Ukrainian translation of Tony Judt’s epoch-making book “Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945” was held at the International Book Arsenal Festival

On June 23, a presentation of the Ukrainian translation of Tony Judt’s epoch-making book “Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945” was held at the International Book Arsenal Festival

On June 23, Kateryna Zarembo’s translation of Tony Judt’s book “Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945” was presented at the International Book Arsenal Festival. Oleksandra Gaidai, science editor of Ukrainian translation, historian, leading researcher at the Museum of History in Kyiv, as well as Volodymyr Yermolenko, philosopher and writer, doctor of political studies, lecturer at the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy took part in the book discussion.

Kateryna Zarembo shared her comments regarding Tony Judt’s book:

  • Tony Judt’s book is deeply personal to him, namely, because the history of Europe since 1945 is also his history. A Jew with Eastern European roots (Judt’s grandparents came from Romania, Russia, and Lithuania), he was born in 1948 in London, studied in Cambridge and Paris, and headed the Remarque Institute in New York from 1995, where he died in 2010, five years after “Postwar” was first published. Therefore, the events described in the book unfolded before the author’s eyes during his own life. And Judt’s experience of these events is read in the text along with his insightful analysis. At the same time, “Postwar” is not just a combination of the histories of a number of countries (among which there are no “important” and “unimportant” for Judt), but a holistic narrative of the history of a continent in which all events are interconnected.
  • “Postwar” goes far beyond the classic texts on European integration, as Judt presents not facts but meanings. The author describes the history of European unification not only through the prism of European institutions, but also through the history of individual states and analysis of public sentiments. At the same time, Judt writes about Europe without ‘pink glasses’, openly expressing both its values ​​and interests (and the conflict of interests of different states). While criticizing, Judt manages not to condemn (or, more precisely, not to evoke feelings of hatred or aggression in the reader). And this is a rare skill at all times when the intellectual is required to be of uncompromising ideological affiliation.
  • The book “Postwar” is a guide not only to the history of Europe, but also to culture and especially to the cinema. Judt is well versed in the national filmographies of many Western European countries. In fact, the author offers the reader not only a list of literature, but also a chronologically arranged list of films to watch to illustrate the times, events, and sentiments he describes.

You may order the book here.